Tag Archives: German Art

From the Collection–“Meissen in Winter” by Ernst Ferdinand Oehme

[We hope that you enjoy this re-posted 2012 blog post in honor of the holiday season! ] Speaking of the holidays, one of my favorite paintings in the Museum Collection is Meissen in Winter by German artist Ernst Ferdinand Oehme. Oehme … Continue reading

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German Tankards and Steins: Part 8–Character Steins

Ready for some more laughs? In this post, we’ll be looking at more German steins meant to be amusing. The industrial revolution of the nineteenth century meant that more goods could be produced quickly and more people could afford those … Continue reading

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German Tankards and Steins: Part 6–Mettlach and the Germany Identity

Last time, we looked at the historical context for artwork in late nineteenth century Germany. In 1871, Germany officially became a unified country. This time, we’ll look at the cultural ramifications of the unification and how it impacted art. Although German-speaking … Continue reading

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German Tankards and Steins: Part 5–Introduction to Late 19th Century Germany

Over the past year, we’ve taken a look at some of the German drinking vessels in the Milwaukee Art Museum’s collection.  The subjects have ranged from luxurious silver tankards to early stoneware vessels, and from high-quality Meissen porcelain to the … Continue reading

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German Tankards and Steins: Part 4—Porcelain

Last month, we demystified tin-glazed earthenware while putting it into a historical context. This month, we’ll figure out the magic behind the material that tin-glazed earthenware attempted to fill in for: porcelain. Introduced to Europe from China in the fourteenth … Continue reading

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