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Art Education Studio at Home

Kohl’s Art Generation Studio at Home: Art in Motion

Make moving art inspired by the kinetic sculpture of Harry Bertoia.

Harry Bertoia (American, b. Italy, 1915–1978), Untitled, 1970. Stainless steel, 66 × 48 in.(67.64 × 121.92 cm). Purchase, with funds given in memory of Maurice W. Berger, President of the Board of Trustees, 1964-1968. M1970.88 © Estate of Harry Bertoia / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Harry Bertoia (American, b. Italy, 1915–1978), Dandelion, 1970. Gold-plated bronze and beryllium, 78 × 34 in. (198.12 × 86.36 cm). Gift of Mrs. Harry Lynde Bradley. M1975.131 Photo credit: P. Richard Eells © 2010 Estate of Harry Bertoia / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Bertoia’s work is often inspired by nature. Many people who visit the Milwaukee Art Museum say that these two sculptures remind them of fireworks: Dandelion when a firework first explodes in the sky and Untitled when the bright sparks leave a trail of light as they fall. See how to use paper, a rubber band, scissors, and tape to make your own moving sculptures to launch into the sky.

Kohl’s Studio at Home activities are designed to be enjoyed with the whole family, regardless of age. Families can work together to learn new techniques and materials, and to explore creativity. As with all new things, provide your child the support and supervision that they need for their developmental level, practicing safe use of tools and materials. You know your kids best!

Brett Henzig is the Youth & Family Programs Educator. He manages the Kohl’s Art Generation Studio, leads school tour workshops, and teaches Youth Studio Classes and Summer Art Camps. Outside the Museum, you’ll find Brett making art, rescuing injured wild animals, and spending time with his wife, dog, cat, and rabbit.

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Art Education Studio at Home

Kohl’s Art Generation Studio at Home: Trip to the Market

Laurent Casimir (Haitian, 1928–1990), Crowded Market, 1972. Oil on Masonite, 36 × 48 in. (91.44 × 121.92 cm). Gift of Richard and Erna Flagg M1991.117 Photo by Larry Sanders

Markets are great places to discover new things to buy and eat. In his work Crowded Market, Laurent Casimir captured a very busy outdoor market in Haiti. The artist filled every inch of his painting with people who are buying and selling goods, helping us imagine what it felt like to be there. Can you spot some of the different things people are buying and selling in the painting?

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Art Education Studio at Home

Kohl’s Art Generation Studio at Home: Father Knows Best

Philomé Obin (Haitian, 1891–1986), Antoine Obin (Haitian, 1929–1990), Philomé, Sénéque and Antoine Obin seated in front of the Cap-Haitian branch of the Centre d’ Art, 1970. Gift of Richard and Erna Flagg, M1991.144. Photo by Efraim Lev-er.

Artist Philomé Obin and his son, Antoine, worked together to complete this painting. In the work, you can see Philomé on the left, Antoine on the right, and Philomé’s brother, Sénéque, who was also an artist, in the center. They are sitting in front of the Centre d’Art in their hometown of Cap-Haïtien. Philomé opened this school and gallery as a branch of the Centre d’Art in Port Au Prince, Haiti. 

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Art Education Studio at Home

Kohl’s Art Generation Studio at Home: Recycled Metal Masterpiece

Georges Liautaud, Child of the Sea, ca. 1959. Cut and forged metal. Gift of Richard and Erna Flagg.

When it comes to materials, many artists are resourceful. To create his sculptures, Haitian blacksmith Georges Liautaud (1899–1991) used discarded steel drums that were left on the island. Liautaud cut and flattened the round drums, used fire to clean off the oil and dirt, and drew designs on the metal in preparation for sculpting. He then cut, punched holes in, and embossed (or pushed into the metal to create raised marks) the material. He was the first artist to create sculptures in this way. Liautaud taught this technique to many other blacksmiths and artists in Haiti. Today, it is still one of the country’s most popular art forms.

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Art Education

Brighten Your Day with Sunny

Alex Katz, Sunny #4, 1971. Oil on canvas. Gift of Mrs. Harry Lynde Bradley. Photo by John R. Glembin. © 2019 Alex Katz/Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York

“Have you ever walked past Sunny #4 and not smiled?” That was the question Mrs. Kari Hahm, a teacher at Zion Lutheran School, posed to the Museum when she recently shared the chalk drawings her students made, at home, of Alex Katz’s Sunny #4.