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Art Studio at Home

Play Date with Art at Home: Make Your Own Futuristic Fashions!

In our Play Date with Art program this month, we imagined what we’d be wearing in the future, and then we used found materials to bring our vision to life. You can do the same at home, using materials from around your house! Your designs can be anything you want. Think of future styles, or think of a special occasion you’d like to dress up for.

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Art Studio at Home

Kohl’s Art Generation Studio at Home: DIY “Stained Glass” Windows

Having to stay inside can get dull—especially if it’s too cold, too windy, or too rainy to play outside. I find myself staring out my window quite a lot these days. It got me thinking: what could make my window more fun? How could I make my indoors more colorful while also sharing some fun with my neighbors, who may be looking out their windows? For our first at-home art activity, I drew inspiration from leaded stained glass windows!

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Art Studio at Home

Kohl’s Art Generation Studio at Home: How to Make Your Own Tangram Shapes

A tangram is a puzzle made of seven shapes that together form a large square. The shapes can be arranged in many different ways to resemble things in the world around us—or create interesting patterns. Here’s how you can create your own set of tangrams to use at home!

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Art

#ArtMinute: Inside A Modern Vision

Take a quick art break, and learn more about three of the works featured in A Modern Vision: European Masterworks from The Phillips Collection with Tanya Paul, Isabel and Alfred Bader Curator of European Art.

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Art Exhibitions

A Modern Vision and a Story of Collecting

Paul Cézanne, Ginger Pot with Pomegranate and Pears, 1893. Oil on canvas. 18 1/4 × 21 7/8 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC. Gift of Gifford Phillips in memory of his father, James Laughlin Phillips, 1939.

The works by Degas, van Gogh, Bonnard, Modigliani, and others on view in the Modern Vision exhibition are from The Phillips Collection and reflect the lifelong collecting efforts of Duncan Phillips, who developed an interest in art at an early age. A five-part podcast on collectors and collecting produced in conjunction with the exhibition reveals that Phillips worked in concert with his wife, Marjorie, herself an artist, whom he met shortly before he opened his museum. She became the deputy director of the museum and, after Duncan’s death, went on to become its director.