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Art Art News Education

Living Legacy: The Junior Docent School Program Fosters Art Education for Over 40 Years!

Student reproduction of Cubi IV by artist David Smith.

Offered at the Museum since 1976, the Junior Docent School Program (JDSP) is a multi-year, multi-visit program for upper elementary students. Legendary Museum Educator Barbara Brown Lee developed the program along with two art-advocating Milwaukee school teachers, and it has since become a model for Museums across the nation, adding depth to art education with its intentional multi-visit design. 

At MAM, the program includes ten themed, docent-guided tours, given to students over the course of three years. In the first year, students learn about the elements of art and are encouraged to investigate works using their senses. In the second year, students make personal and interpersonal connections with art by exploring Portraiture, Wisconsin Stories, and Communities and Traditions. In the third year of JDSP, students extend their understanding of art and history with an American Stories tour and an Antiquities to Contemporary tour—and eventually select a work of art for the culminating capstone graduation project. 

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Art

#AskAnArchivist Day: You Asked, They Answered

Much like our curators, the Museum’s archivists typically work behind-the-scenes. However, on October 2, in honor of Ask An Archivist Day, our social media followers were able to learn more about archival work and get a peek inside the daily lives of our on-site archivists. Check out some of the questions and responses below!

What training do you have? How did this become a career for you?

“My educational background includes a Masters in Information Studies and a Masters in Public History among several other related studies, certificates, and work experiences. With the rapid growth of information, data management has become a vital part of the Museum’s ability to document and manage its extraordinary collections and its everyday business activities. With my past studies in history and art, libraries and archives became a natural draw where I could apply my knowledge and skills to assist others.” –Heather Winter, Librarian/Archivist

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Art

#AskACurator Day: You Asked, They Answered

You see the exhibitions and the beautiful works of art in our galleries, but how often do you see the people who, through careful thought, research, and planning, helped bring them here? 

Much of a curator’s work takes place behind-the-scenes, and most Museum visitors only get to see the final products—new art acquisitions and stunning exhibitions. But on September 18, 2019, in honor of International #AskACurator Day, we encouraged our social media followers to ask our curators anything! Check out some of the questions and responses below.

Ariel Pate, assistant curator of photography, leads a tour through her exhibition Portrait of Milwaukee.

How did you start your career in the art field? Always a curator or did you dabble first?

“I dabbled in painting as a child and teen, but even then it was obvious my talents were in analysis rather than practice. I actually majored in history as an undergraduate, but fell back in love with art and with museums, and went to graduate school for art history and museum studies. During that time, I did many internships and practicums and through those opportunities, finally landed my first job as a curator.” –Brandon Ruud, Abert Family Curator of American Art

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Art

New Music will Accompany the “Wings” Oct. 21–Nov. 10

If you visit the Museum between October 21 and November 10, you’ll notice the rise of the Burke Brise Soleil (“wings”) is a bit more rocking. The daily architectural feat, rising at 10 a.m., noon, and right before the Museum closes, will be temporarily accompanied by the song “Elevation” by U2. 

We’re not just in a “rock music” kind of mood now that the wings are spruced up. In early June, the Museum kicked off its annual giving campaign—with a new, exciting twist. For every gift of $50 or more, donors received one entry into our “Program the Wings” drawing, and one lucky winner was selected to pick the music that would accompany the opening and closing of the “wings” for a short period of time.

So, who won? Drumroll, please….

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Art Art News Education

Milwaukee Art Museum Celebrates Arts in Education Year-round

At the Museum, the impact of arts education can often be seen and heard—from the awe-inspired gazes upon entering the Calatrava-designed building, to the questions, discussions, and laughter that frequently fill the galleries.

In 2010, National Arts in Education Week was officially recognized by Congress and, since then, schools and institutions across the country have continued to celebrate annually, the second week in September. Championed by the non-profit organization, Americans for the Arts, this celebration is designed to encourage educational decision makers and elected officials to support what art museums have known for a long time: The arts are essential for a well-rounded education and for creating access and inclusivity to that end. Art museums commonly support this initiative with school programs and education departments that know all about the powerful impact of the arts in transforming learning experiences for visitors of all ages.