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Art Education Studio at Home

Kohl’s Art Generation Studio at Home: Picturing Pets, Sunny

We commonly refer to dogs as everyone’s best friend, and for me, that’s true. But I have many other best friends, too, including my cat, my rabbit, and some nice people. Each has their own unique personality. Artworks can also have unique “personalities,” or styles. Artistic styles help us explain how artworks look and how they were made. There are many different styles of art.

Alex Katz’s Sunny #4, a larger-than-life portrait of the artist’s dog, is painted in the Pop Art style. Pop artists often used bold lines, flat shapes, and vivid colors in their artworks. Here, Katz used long, straight brushstrokes to paint Sunny’s hair, and for Sunny’s tongue, he painted a flat, pink rectangle.

Alex Katz, Sunny #4, 1971. Gift of Mrs. Harry Lynde Bradley, M1975.143. Photo by John R. Glembin. © 2019 Alex Katz/Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York

Let’s make our own drawings inspired by Sunny!

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Art Education Studio at Home

Kohl’s Art Generation Studio at Home: Story Time

Did you miss Story Time at the Kohl’s Art Generation Family Sundays at Home: Animals in Art event last month? Catch it here! Emily reads Help! A Story of Friendship by Holly Keller.

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Art Education Studio at Home

Kohl’s Art Generation Studio at Home: Adventure in Art

Enjoy a highlight from our recent virtual event, Kohl’s Art Generation Family Sundays at Home: Animals in Art. “Step inside” a painting with Ali, and learn to move like a lion!

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Art Education Studio at Home

Kohl’s Art Generation Studio at Home: Animal Sketchbooks

Did you miss Kohl’s Art Generation Family Sundays at Home: Animals in Art? No worries! We’re featuring some of our favorite activities from the virtual event right here, on the blog.

Check out Brett’s animal drawings, and then make your own sketchbook.

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Art Education Studio at Home

Kohl’s Art Generation Studio at Home: Chalk the State

JULY 25–26, 2020

This weekend, take to your sidewalks, driveways, and parking lots to create bright, joyful chalk art! We’re joining with the Museum of Wisconsin Art (MOWA) and many other arts organizations throughout the state to encourage a weekend of outdoor art making. Spread positive messages to family, friends, and neighbors—or create your own masterpiece, inspired by works in the Museum’s collection!

Many famous artists have used chalk to make both sketches and finished works of art. To create the drawing below, Pablo Picasso (1881–1973) used pastels. Pastels are made from pigment, or color, and chalk; the two are blended and held together with a binder. Picasso’s pastel drawing of a rooster shows many of the special things you can do with this material. Use sidewalk chalk to make a drawing outdoors. Save pastels for drawing on paper!

Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881–1973), Rooster, 1938. Pastel on paper
sheet: 30 1/4 × 22 3/8 in. (76.84 × 56.83 cm), framed: 37 1/2 × 29 1/2 × 1 3/4 in. (95.25 × 74.93 × 4.45 cm). Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Lynde Bradley M1959.373. Photographer credit: Larry Sanders ©2010 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York