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Warhol, Warhol, Everywhere a Warhol

Everybody loves Andy Warhol! Who isn’t immediately attracted to the bright colors, crisp lines, and repetition in Andy Warhol’s artwork?

Colorful recreation of a Campbell's soup can
Andy Warhol (American, 1928–1987), Campbell’s Soup, 1965 (detail). Acrylic on canvas 36 × 24 in. (91.44 × 60.96 cm). Gift of Mrs. Harry Lynde Bradley M1977.156. Photo by Efraim Lev-er © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Colorful recreation of a Campbell's soup can
Andy Warhol (American, 1928–1987), Campbell’s Soup, 1965. Acrylic on canvas 36 × 24 in. (91.44 × 60.96 cm). Gift of Mrs. Harry Lynde Bradley M1977.156. Photo by Efraim Lev-er © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Everybody loves Andy Warhol! Who isn’t immediately attracted to the bright colors, crisp lines, and repetition in Andy Warhol’s artwork? Not to mention the fact that Warhol himself was such a character, playing with the art world, celebrity, and fame.

One of Warhol’s most iconic images, that of the Campbell’s Soup Can, is now available for mass-market purchase. For 75 cents. That’s right. 75 cents for your very own piece of Andy Warhol art history!

Okay, I’m dramatizing a little bit here. There’s tomato soup inside that Warhol artwork. By which I mean, Campbell’s Soup has released limited-edition cans of their tomato soup printed with Warhol’s Campbell’s Soup design. You can buy them at your local Target.

And, of course, you can visit the original Campbell’s Soup right here at the Museum, in Gallery 19 on the Main Level.

If you’d like to spend a little more for your Warhol fix, and you need to round out your beauty collection, well, there are plenty more limited-edition Warholian goodies for you to purchase.

Warhol Soup Cans from Target. Photo by Kim Weiss

I’ve known for a while about Andy Warhol-scented perfume (yes, you read that right), but now there’s even Andy Warhol lip gloss!

Andy Warhol themed lip gloss by NARS cosmetics company. Photo credit: Sephora.com
Andy Warhol themed lip gloss by NARS cosmetics company. Photo from Sephora.com

My 16-year-old little sister, who is very in-the-know about all things makeup related, knows of my art obsession and texted me a link to this limited edition set of NARS lip glosses inspired by Andy himself.

Then she informed me that not only will there be lip gloss but a whole set of Warhol-inspired makeup, including eye shadow palettes pressed into a pattern based on his Flower lithograph, and nail polish shades inspired by colors used in his prints.

If this is all a little overwhelming to you, too, maybe we should turn to something a bit more educational than eye shadows.

Andy Warhol’s nephew, James Warhola, wrote a great picture book, Uncle Andy’s, about his childhood visits to his famous uncle’s apartment in New York. Educators here love to use this book for Story Time in the Galleries.

James Warhola, Uncle Andy's (2003).
James Warhola, Uncle Andy’s (2003).

I don’t know about you, but stunned though I am with the overload of Warholian goodies, I am totally game for a fall full of Andy Warhol. Bring on more art in my day-to-day life!

If you’ll be in New York City anytime soon, the Metropolitan Museum of Art is also getting in on the autumn Warhol trend with an exhibition called Regarding Andy Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years, all about Warhol’s artistic influence.

If you’ll be in Pittsburgh, visit the Andy Warhol Museum and recreate the artist’s process for filming your own Screen Test.

Chelsea Emelie Kelly was the Museum’s Manager of Digital Learning. In addition to working on educational technology initiatives like the Kohl’s Art Generation Lab and this blog, she oversaw and taught teen programs.

One reply on “Warhol, Warhol, Everywhere a Warhol”

In 1981, while on assignment for Newsweek, photographer Lynn Goldsmith captured images of Prince, which were never subsequently published. In 1984, Vanity Fair commissioned Warhol to create a pop art recreation of one of these photos. Warhol used the photograph to create the “Prince Series” — a set of high-contrast images infused with dramatic pops of color in a style similar to that of his “Campbell’s Soup Cans.”

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