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Behind the Scenes Education

Intern Voice: Media Creation and Teen Programs

Teens talk with Design staff. Screenshot of the teens' final project video.
Teens talk with Design staff. Screenshot of the teens’ final project video.
I had the pleasure of being the Media Intern for the 4-week-long High School Internship Program at the Milwaukee Art Museum. As an Interactive Media Design and History major at Alverno College, being chosen to intern at such a beautiful place full of creativity, history, and passionate people was not only a great learning experience, but also a real treat for me.

This summer’s High School Internship Program was slightly different than how it had been in the past—it was part of the TED-Ed Clubs pilot program (TED-Ed is the educational side channel of TED Talks). As the Media Intern, it was my mission to film and edit a video directed by the 16 teens, which answered the question: “What are museums for?”

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Education

Teen Voice: Victoria–The Museum’s Impact on Milwaukee

Victoria and her castle in the Kohl's Art Generation Gallery. Photo by Emerald Summers
Victoria and her castle in the Kohl’s Art Generation Gallery. Photo by Emerald Summers
The first time I saw the Milwaukee Art Museum I was in awe. The huge wings and the stark white building against the lake made the Museum seem like a weird foreign castle that I wanted to explore and get lost in. When I got inside, I was suddenly intimidated as I realized I couldn’t lay my grubby first grade fingers on anything! It was probably one of the biggest let downs in my first grade life I had ever encountered, but now, coming back as a senior in high school (and knowing about artwork conservation), I know it was for a good reason.

Four weeks ago I had no idea that I would be creating a post that would be viewed by anyone who accessed Milwaukee Art Museum Blog. When I first started the internship I was ecstatic: Working at the art museum? I was movin’ on up in life. Then when I found out I was going to create a blog post, you could pretty much say my day–if not year–was made.

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Education

Teen Voice: Rachelle–Connecting with Art at the Milwaukee Art Museum

Rachelle and Victoria at the exhibition model in the Kohl's Art Generation Lab. Photo by Emerald Summers
Rachelle and Victoria at the exhibition model in the Kohl’s Art Generation Lab. Photo by Emerald Summers
To me, art is not about the finished product but instead is a process of thoughts, motives, symbols, creativity and challenge. A museum’s central purpose is to secure and preserve the heritage of each work as a whole, ensuring that the voice of each artist is heard to reflect their thoughts, curiosity, and growth. Museums connect art with visitors beyond just the visual sense.

On a personal level, art has always been a part of my life. Whether it be in dance, thought, or in action; art surrounds me. As an intern here at the Milwaukee Art Museum, my appreciation for creativity, innovation, and artists new and old has only grown. Art as a whole, has changed through time, increasing in meaning and expression. In my eyes, the finished product of art does not need to make complete sense to every individual. The same piece of art I may find beautiful may not meet another’s standards of beauty. Art lives on, beyond the surface of a canvas, in the Museum.

Categories
Behind the Scenes Education

Teen Voice: What Are Museums For?

Teens in Windhover Hall. Screenshot from teens' final project video.
Teens in Windhover Hall. Screenshot from teens’ final project video.
While other teenagers spent their summer sleeping in, playing video games, and eating junk food, I was given the wonderful opportunity to work behind-the-scenes at the Milwaukee Art Museum along with fifteen other high schoolers.

During our internship, we learned in depth about the hard work and dedication that goes into running a museum. The internship was also part of the TED-Ed Clubs pilot program, and we were tasked as a group to create a video about our essential question: “What are museums for?”

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Education

Teen Voice: Dominique–Connecting Lives, History, and Art

Dominique in the Kohl's Art Generation Lab. Photo by Emerald Summers
Dominique in the Kohl’s Art Generation Lab. Photo by Emerald Summers
No one really knows how much the Milwaukee Art Museum can make an impact on their life if they never take a visit. In becoming an intern at the Milwaukee Art Museum, I have seen the Museum in a different perspective: how it has a role in people’s lives and in the community.

Starting from a small art gallery, the Milwaukee Art Museum merged and combined with other organizations and people to form what it is now. With, of course, the help of the community, the Museum has thrived into a famous attraction. A few people from the community went out of their way to start the Museum, and now the Museum is returning the favor to the community as a place to view and learn about art. Visitors even count the Museum one of “the top three of all I’ve seen since traveling around the world.”

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Behind the Scenes Education

Teen Satellite Students Take Final Project Into Their Own Hands

Screencapture of Breanna W.'s teen programs video.
Screencapture of Breanna W.’s teen programs video.

This coming year will be my third year as Chelsea’s intern, so I’ve definitely come to know my way around the Art Museum and its many programs. I work with Chelsea mostly with the Satellite High School Internship Program, thus I was thrilled to have a hand in some of the prepping and planning for the spring term.

Prior to the start of the spring semester, Chelsea and I did some program brainstorming for the Satellite Program. Most of our conversation was about what the final project would look like for the students. Read more to find out more about the teaching process and view the students’ final project videos!

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Behind the Scenes Collection Curatorial Prints and Drawings

Out of the Vault–William Copley and the Instant Art Collection

Installing S. M. S. (Shit Must Stop) Number 4, 1968; note Roy Lichtenstein’s Folded Hat, vinyl hat construction, Purchase, with funds from Kit S. Basquin, George and Angela Jacobi with matching funds from Johnson Controls, and Jacques and Barbara Hussussian. M1995.290. Photo credit Nate Pyper.
Installing S. M. S. (Shit Must Stop) Number 4, 1968; note Roy Lichtenstein’s Folded Hat, vinyl hat construction, Purchase, with funds from Kit S. Basquin, George and Angela Jacobi with matching funds from Johnson Controls, and Jacques and Barbara Hussussian. M1995.290. Photo credit Nate Pyper.

William Copley (1919-1996) was an American art entrepreneur who was involved in every facet of the art world at one time or another during his career.

Copley worked as a painter, writer, gallery owner, collector, patron and publisher. He began painting in the early 1920s and identified with the Surrealists.

Surrealism was an art and culture movement that began in the early 1920s and persevered through the 1960s. It had a major influence on abstract expressionism, postmodernism and popular culture. It was founded in Paris by a small group of writers and artists who found that the conscious mind repressed the power of imagination, creating taboos in our culture and guilt in our actions.

S.M.S.1 was an experimental magazine created by Copley during the turbulent year of 1968.

Categories
Behind the Scenes Exhibitions

The Design Behind Color Rush

Color Rush Advertisement
Color Rush Advertisement
When the design team was tasked with developing the identity for Color Rush: 75 Years of Color Photography in America, a comprehensive exhibition charting the history of color photography in the United States from 1907 to 1981 and including nearly 200 objects, we knew we had our work cut out for us. The work in Color Rush is robust, ranging from early experimentation to oversaturated mid-century advertisements to the conceptual thrust of the late 1970s. We wondered, how would we create a strong typographical mark that would encompass and speak for such a full and varied exhibition?

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20th and 21st Century Design Art Collection Education Events

Connecting the Dots

Grete Marks, Tea Service, ca. 1930. Milwaukee Art Museum, Purchase, by exchange. Photo by John R. Glembin
Grete Marks, Tea Service, ca. 1930. Milwaukee Art Museum, Purchase, by exchange. Photo by John R. Glembin.

Let’s begin with three seemingly disparate thoughts.

One: Since I started working here at the Museum as the Team Coordinator for the Kohl’s Color Wheels art education outreach program in August, I have seen over 25,000 people while out in the community. As you can imagine, the idea of the accessibility of art has definitely been on my mind.

Two: As part of the Museum community, last month, I had the chance to see two lectures in one day: one on the German potter Grete Marks, given by Mel Buchanan, the Assistant Curator of 20th Century Design at the Museum; the other about the creative process at Pixar Animation Studios, given by Dan Holland, a sketch artist there. It made my day.

Three: I also teach freshmen at MIAD. One of my classes focuses on discussing the philosophical and practical underpinnings of these young artists’ budding visual practices. The other day my students started an impromptu discussion about Felix Baumgartner jumping from the stratosphere. It was a great class.

So, where am I going with all of this? Let me explain.

Categories
American Art Collection Curatorial

From the Collection: Wisconsin Crazy Quilt

Quillt with many different squares
Margaret A. Beattie (American, b. ca. 1860), Crazy Quilt, 1883 (detail). Pieced and quilted silk with metallic yarn, and oil paint, 76 × 64 1/2 in. (193.04 × 163.83 cm). Purchase, with funds from Marion Wolfe, Mrs. Helen L. Pfeifer and Friends of Art M1997.58 Photo credit: Larry Sanders
Quillt with many different squares
Margaret A. Beattie (American, b. ca. 1860), Crazy Quilt, 1883. Pieced and quilted silk with metallic yarn, and oil paint, 76 × 64 1/2 in. (193.04 × 163.83 cm). Purchase, with funds from Marion Wolfe, Mrs. Helen L. Pfeifer and Friends of Art M1997.58 Photo credit: Larry Sanders

My grandmother made about a dozen quilts in her lifetime and having them around so much as a kid, I sort of took them for granted.

Before I worked at the Museum as an intern, I visited the Milwaukee Art Museum’s exhibition American Quilts: Selections from the Winterthur Collection in the summer of 2010. As many exhibitions of material culture tend to do, the display gave me a new appreciation for artforms that had surrounded me my whole life. I saw my grandmother’s craft in a new way, and as someone who just a few years ago mastered sewing on a button, the awe I feel for the craftsmanship is possibly only outdone by the respect I feel for the artistry of quilt making.